No Security Without Rights

(Photo: Pedro Mata /Fotomovimiento) The struggle against terrorism contributes to an alarming and constant retreat of the civil and political rights of people. In the context of a multipolar world scenario, which is strongly conditioned by an unprecedented evolution of national, regional and international responses to new terrorist threats, the principles of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights seem to have been relegated to an opaque area between the “necessary and legitimate” fight against terrorism and the gross violations that it perpetrates. After the 9/11 attacks in the United States, a growing wave of national and international promises of security was rolled on in a hegemonic way, as a response to the perception of a serious threat to world peace and safety. Since the beginning of the 21st century, the terrifying expressions and dimensions of the new terrorist threat at a global level, have led to the adoption of significant and unavoidable changes in the legal, political, economic and defensive agendas of states and international organizations, creating growing incompatibilities between many of these terrorist measures and the respect, protection and promotion of human rights. The report “No Security Without Rights’’ compiles various efforts to denounce the perpetrated human rights’ violations through the implementation of the new anti-terrorism normative tools that have been approved by the Euro-Mediterranean regions in the past years. The ambiguity in the definitions of terrorism which are included in the national legislations leads to an indiscriminate persecution of individuals and groups, as well as to the arbitrary criminalization of activities that are perceived as threats to the state’s security. Procedural safeguards in criminal matters, fair treatment to accused people, and fundamental rights and freedoms are being relativized in this framework of fight against terror; while the authorities’ powers, impunity, injustice and severeness of the penalties charged to the accused increase without restriction, need or glimmer of proportionality.

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List of PVE Best Practices

The following list are the good practices to prevent all forms of violent extremism in the Euro-mediterranean region: EuroMeSCo Annual Conference “Confronting Violent Extremism in the Euro-Mediterranean” Conference “Resilient Cities: Countering Violent Extremism at Local Level” Itinerant Exhibition ‘’Refugees, why?’’ Annual Course on Human Rights for Global Justice Strategy BCN Anti-Rumour Kif-Kif: Comics for Inclusion Observatory of Islamophobia in the Media Social Forum against Islamophoby Frontera Sur Project XABACA: International network against censorship on Arab women’s art Kulluna Muwatinun (We are All Citizens) Khotwa: Promoting regional integration in the Maghreb ARDD Political & Civic Participation Unit Defender a Quién Defiende Movement for Peace Peace Studies Centre Delàs Urban Violence World Forum European Forum for Urban Security International Peace Bureau Irídia International Civil Service ’Dangerously Disproportionate: The Ever-Expanding National Security State in Europe’’ Report ’An Economy for the 99%’’ Report Observatory of ESCR ’Alert!’’ Report Shock Monitor Human Rights and Companies Observatory European Institute of the Mediterranean Union for the Mediterranean (UfM) Muslims against Islamophobia Casa Nostra Casa Vostra Stop Mare Mortum Lysistrata project UNDP Global Meeting on Preventing Violent Extremism Peace Action, Training and Research Institute of Romania (PATRIR) Euromed Survey of Experts and Actors (7th edition) Peace and Freedom Organization in Kurdistan (PFOK) Al Mesalla SUDS Fotomovimento Proxy Observatory AntiInmigration Research Paper Iraqi Civil Society Solidarity Initiative SAHWA Project L’Islam, Objet Médiatique START Islamophobia, a challenge for us all Report Quick Guide to Combat Islamophobia in Twitter Twist Islamophobia Euro-Arab Foundation (FUNDEA) Prevent Extremism Training Five-Point Test for Journalists WE CAN! Plataforma Ciudadana contra la Islamofobia Let’s advertise Common Values Project Meetings on Islamophobia and Gender Muslim Women against Islamophobia Anti-Islamophobia Declaration Reimagining Muslim Spaces Study Women in the Mediterranean Space INGYouth Speakers Program Anna Lindh Education Handbook on Intercultural Citizenship in the Euro-Mediterranean Region Young Arab Voices DAWRAK: Citizens for Dialogue Erbil Marathon International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation and Political Violence (ICSR) UKSSD The Road to Ninevah: Social Cohesion, Peace, Coexistence We Love Tripoli Shape MENA PeaceWomen Programme Youth Can Organization SAiD: Attention and Reporting Service for Victims of Racism and Xenophobia Closeness to the Arab World Course Euro-Mediterranean Women’s Foundation Lawyers’ International Observatory Beyond Reform & Development (BRD) Cairo Institute for Human Rights Studies (CIHRS) Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations Association Djazairouna des victimes du terrorisme Education for Development Fighters for Peace Forum des Organisations Nationales de Droits Humains Artis International Forum Marocain pour la Vérité et la Justice Tunisian Leaders for Human Security Hamish Jeunesse Sans Frontières JOHUD Youth Training and Empowerment Leaders of Tomorrow Campaign to Combat Hatred Discourse in the Media Euro-Mediterranean Foundation of Support to Human Rights Defenders (EMHRF) Permanent Peace Movement Palestinian Centre for Human Rights Unified Platform Against Gender Violence SAVE – Sisters Against Violent Extremism “Empowering Women, Countering Extremism” Training Program Radicalisation and Counter-Radicalisation: A Gender Perspective JWU Legal Literacy Courses Union of Palestinian Women Committees SAWA East & West Center for Sustainable Development Penal Reform International  

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VIOLENT EXTREMISM IN SOCIAL MEDIA NETWORKS

Under-reporting of hate crimes based on racism and xenophobia continue to be a significant problem across the Mediterranean. Hate speech and discrimination are the most visible part of several violent extremist movements. Violent extremism (VE) is a diverse phenomenon. The spread of violent extremism is currently done through social media network, where the immense accumulation of information requires the expertise on Big Data. For that, there is the necessity to contribute in several key initiatives identified. The present document intends to present a desk review on the expression of violent extremism in social media network, but, more specifically, tries to give an specific answer on how to combat online hate speech in social media networks through a roadmap. .

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GOOD PRACTICES IN THE EURO-MEDITERRANEAN REGION

Civil society represents an underused resource to confront violent extremism. We can offer a positive and nonviolent vision of our future together that can create an effective alternative message in front of the voices and groups that promote violence. Civil society needs to be supported, protected and empowered to make a constructive contribution to confront violent extremism. However, the good-willing positions expressed have not been followed by real on-the-ground measures to reinforce the civil society contribution to prevent violent extremism. Actually, there is a growing concern that states are interested in restraining the space of civil society. In the name of fighting terrorism, governments have curtailed political freedoms and imposed restrictive measures against human rights defenders and civil society activists in many countries. States systematically invoke national security and public safety to shrink the space of independent civil society activities. In many countries, special legislative and regulatory measures have been used to crack down on NGOs and activists who advocate for social change and criticize government policies. These measures make it more difficult for civil society actors to promote human rights and tolerance as an essential element in the prevention of violent extremism. It is essential to maintain and protect civil society if we want to address the conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism. The following document aims to share good practices to prevent all forms of violent extremism in the Euro-mediterranean region, who have been classified both by the different Goals of the OPEV Plan of Action as well as the 3 main regions of the Euro-mediterranean region.

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PVE Plan of Action in Tunisia

On the 22nd of February, NOVACT, the CMODH and the Tunisian Human Rights League (LTDH) organized the seminar “Reinforcing Resilience and Alternative Discourses: Towards a New Tunisian Plan of Action for the Prevention of Violent Extremism?” where more than 60 Tunisian civil society organizations, representatives of the United Nations and Wim Kok, former Prime Minister of the Netherlands and former President of the Club of Madrid, participated. This seminar presented different international strategies for the prevention of violent extremism, the main outputs of the Barcelona conference “Towards a new paradigm: preventing violent extremism”</a> and discussed the priorities between the Civil society organizations, who emphasized the importance of networking and collecting priority actions for the country. Furthermore, NOVACT, the CMODH and the LTDH organized a seminar with the main Tunisian youth organizations to present the action plan adopted in Barcelona and to create a joint prevention strategy in Tunisia. The Tunisian youth expressed their willingness to adhere to the plan of action as well as their concern at the unemployment and social exclusion rates that are facing young people in the country, as well as the lack of opportunities for young people to participate in the democratic construction of the country. The Euro-Mediterranean Civil Society Action Plan for the Prevention of Violent Extremism was drawn up at the Barcelona conference “Towards a New Paradigm: Preventing Violent Extremism”, attended by more than 320 participants of 172 civil society associations from 22 Countries of the Euro-Mediterranean region. This plan of action aims to make a constructive contribution by civil society in the prevention of violent extremism, addressing this phenomenon in all its perspectives and forms, from institutional violence to hate speech. The adoption of the plan of action brings together and harmonises the actions of the civil society in the region, and favorises the adoption of a joint strategy to deal with hate and intolerance.

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